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It’s not uncommon to see athletes performing dryland agility and plyometric drills while standing too tall. If you’re not used to a deep skating stance or lack a bit of mobility in the hips, then this will often be the cause of a high posture.

Take any agility ladder drill. These are sometimes criticized for not being “sports specific” enough and the by way a lot of athletes perform them, I have to agree.

You can fix this and make agility ladder drills relevant for hockey training by pushing the hips back (a hip hinge) and bending the knees to a comfortable angle without leaning forward. By keeping your hips low you get into a skating posture, which activates the powerful gluteal muscles, the hip flexors and extensors and the hamstrings. Your power will increase and you transform the drill into something that will translate to the ice.

The same is true for plyometric jumping drills, which actually demand that you keep your hips low so you’re able to drive through the jump and absorb the landing.

Be safe and have fun with your training!

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