2013-07-30_0025

Mobility through the thoracic spine is important in many sports because it allows force transfer through the upper body. Many skills in hockey, golf, tennis, baseball and football require this twisting motion through the upper spine. If mobility is lacking in the thoracic spine the lower back is forced to compensate. Imagine a slap shot where the lower back had to rotate to enable the upper body swing through the shot fully. What would the

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2013-08-08_0010

Today we are going to look at what muscles you should be targeting to increase skating strength and power. The biomechanics of a skating stride is not a simple up and down squat motion. The low forward drive, stride locomotion in skating is generated synergistically by the quadriceps the gluteals and hamstrings in conjunction with the hips and other leg stabilizer muscles. This why there the prevailing opinion in strength and conditioning circles is that

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2013-07-29_0073

Probably one of the most misunderstood areas of hockey off-ice training is how to approach increasing shot power. While wrist and forearm strengthening exercises can help, athletes will improve much better by increasing the rotational power of their core and hips. For increasing core power, one of the best and most popular approaches is to use medicine ball throws. A simple way to start is to use to stand 4-6 feet away from a sturdy

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It’s not uncommon to see athletes performing dryland agility and plyometric drills while standing too tall. If you’re not used to a deep skating stance or lack a bit of mobility in the hips, then this will often be the cause of a high posture. Take any agility ladder drill. These are sometimes criticized for not being “sports specific” enough and the by way a lot of athletes perform them, I have to agree. You

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